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Maryport regeneration scheme

We have great plans for the redevelopment of Maryport to make it an even better place to live and visit. That's why we have set up a team specifically to work on regeneration projects in the town.

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Meet The Team 

These are the people shaping the future of Maryport. They are making it an even better place to work and live.

Steve Caunce

Capital Programmes Manager

Steve previously worked as a Contracts Manager in the construction industry within the Private sector carrying out work for United Utilities, Yorkshire Water and other Utility services together. He has a wide experience in general Building and Civil Engineering projects.

He joined Allerdale in March 2022 taking up the position of Capital Programme Manager to oversee the delivery of Capital Projects in both Maryport, Workington and Keswick.

photograph of Steve Caunce

Steve Caunce

Joe Broomfield

Senior Specialist Capital Projects Manager

Joe is no stranger to Maryport as he previously managed Maryport Townscape Heritage Initiative (MTHI). The scheme brought several empty buildings back into use including the Golden Lion Hotel

He now manages the following projects in the Regeneration Programme:

  • Maryport Town Hall. Reconfiguration of the ground floor and external improvement works to the whole of the building.
  • Maryport Residential Conversion grant Scheme (MRCS) – working with property owners to bring vacant first-floor or above properties back into use for residential purposes.
  • 1 Senhouse Street capital works – the Maritime Museum will move to Christ Church with 1 Senhouse Street being turned into an art gallery (this is in partnership with Joanne)
  • Boardwalk project. Creating a formal, off-road pedestrian link between North Quay and Maryport promenade.
Photo of Joe Broomfield

Joe Broomfield

Joanne Spencer

Project Manager

Joanne has a plethora of experience and has spent fifteen plus years mainly in the voluntary and community sector where she managed large scale, often complex development and regeneration projects.

Joanne now manages a number of projects in the Maryport Regeneration programme including the capital development works to restore Christ Church which will become the new home of Maryport Maritime Museum. She also works with the Maryport Arts and Heritage Partnership who are responsible for designing and delivering a programme of cultural activity celebrating the local character and heritage of Maryport’s Senhouse Street.

Photo of Joanne Spencer

Joanne Spencer

Jeremy Hewitson

Strategic Advisor Projects Maryport

Jeremy has previously worked in Housing Development & Enabling with Carlisle City Council & Eden District Council since 2004. He has initiated a number of successful Housing projects by delivering approximately 100 affordable homes and 60 Extra Care properties, including facilitating practical onsite training opportunities for local construction students. Jeremy has a wealth of extensive experience of managing countywide multi-agency strategic partnerships.

For the Maryport Regeneration project he plays a key role in monitoring and overseeing the overall programme including the public realm schemes.

Photo Jeremy Hewitson

Jeremy Hewitson

Our schemes for improving Maryport

Click below to read more about a specific part of our plans.

The Wave, harbour and promenade

Locals and visitors played their part in the creation of the new £5 million+ investment plans, which, if given government approval, are due to be completed by summer 2024. The money is being provided through the government's Future High Streets Fund. 

The town centre, Wave, harbourside and promenade are the areas which will benefit:

On the prom

  • A promenade café and bike hub on the site of the old toilet block

On the harbourside

  • A splash park for family fun
  • An outdoor events area, ideal for entertainment, festivals or markets
  • A rebuild of the Shiver Me Timbers play area

In the Wave

  • A purpose-built adventure soft play park ideal for younger children
  • Improvements to Clip n’ Climb to appeal to a wider audience
  • The creation of multi-use rooms
  • Enhancements to the gym

Across the town

  • A wayfinding and public realm scheme to tie the town centre, harbourside and promenade together and link them with the station and car parks

We are currently waiting on approval of these schemes from the government. 

Christchurch and Shipping Brow

The project:

Christ Church, one of Maryport’s most prominent and historic landmarks, is going to become the new Maritime Museum. 

Why?

We want to create more great experiences and leisure opportunities in Maryport for local residents, and attract more visitors who will stay longer and support local businesses along the high street.

Cost

£2 million+

Funders

Future High Streets Fund & Cumberland Council

Background

During the public consultation, it became clear that the local community has a real love, appreciation and pride for this Grade II-listed building. It dates back to 1872 and appears in artwork by the likes of LS Lowry and his protégé Sheila Fell.

Having watched over Maryport’s historic harbour for hundreds of years, Christ Church is a fitting home for the Maritime Museum’s fascinating collection. Its exhibits had been crammed into a former pub across the road on Senhouse Street since 1975 and that building is now being transformed into the new Shipping Brow Gallery. 

Moving into Christ Church offers more space for the collection, while also bringing a prominent vacant building back into use. Artefacts which showcase Maryport’s strong seafaring past and links to the famed vessels like the Titanic will be prominently displayed, and there will be room for visiting exhibitions too. 

Progress

Planning permission has been granted, repairs will be carried out to the exterior of the building while, inside, preparations will be made to accommodate the Museum. 

This will include creating internal structures like a timber pod and mezzanine floor which will enhance the building’s dramatic interior, and house the current collections, along with and future exhibitions and displays. The materials used will be in keeping with the building’s interior. 

Completion date

Summer 2024
 

The Carlton and The Town Hall

The project

This former bank and cinema, in one of the town’s most prominent locations, will become a centre for arts, culture and community.

Why?

The purchase of the Carlton will allow new activity and attract more footfall on the high street. Whether that’s creativity, culture, technology and more - this will be focused in one town centre space for the benefit of locals and visitors alike.

Cost

£3 million+

Funders

Future High Streets Fund & Cumberland Council

Background

Exciting plans have been approved to breathe new life into this historic building on the corner of Senhouse Street and High Street. It will become a focus for local arts and crafts, music, theatre, and entertainment with features including a flexible performance space with café bar, box office, flexible artists’ studio, and sound studios. They will be accessible and available for use by the local community, schools and performers. 

The Carlton development will also involve the demolition and redevelopment of a neighbouring empty property at 28 Senhouse Street to allow the creation of a new box office and café, complete with landscaped courtyard. Bricked up windows on the first floor will be opened up and the vaulted ceiling exposed with rooflights installed, flooding the building with natural light.

Progress

BEC, formerly known as Britain’s Energy Coast and now Building Extraordinary Communities, will work with the Council while taking the lead on the transformation of this landmark. The aim is to replicate some aspects of The Bus Station in Whitehaven, a place described as ‘a hybrid space blending work, creativity, learning, food and drink in an inspiring and collaborative environment’.

Plans to turn nearby Empire Yard into an outdoor market on Senhouse Street have been shelved due to the difficulty in purchasing the land and properties that were required. This freed up funding to support the delivery of other capital projects.

Completion date

Summer 2024

The project

This Georgian building, which began its life as the Cumberland Union Bank, has been brought back to life as Cumberland Council offices and a community hub.

Why?

This landmark building sits in the heart of the town where the commercial area and harbour meet. It has been restored for the town and the community and is available for their use.

Cost

£220,000

Funders

Historic England Heritage Action Zone

Background

The Town Hall is one of the town’s most historic buildings and sits in a prominent spot at the top of Senhouse Street. Now these renovations are complete, the exterior is gleaming with new paintwork, the roof, render and windows have been reinstated or repaired, and doorways widened to allow easier disabled access. Inside, the rooms have been remodelled to provide flexible office space and an accessible toilet has been installed for users of the building. The original coving and woodwork have been restored, and wood panelling replaced.

The interior design also celebrates Maryport’s past and its future. A bespoke glass mural featuring the Maryport skyline greets visitors at the main entrance, as well as forming part of its fire protection measures. A new piece of work by town artist Alan Roper has its first showing in the building, and the Made in Maryport Cultural Consortium will be installing future creative exhibitions.

Progress

Increasing numbers of community organisations are also using the newly refurbished building. It is home to Maryport Town Council and the Maryport regeneration team from Cumberland Council. Residents can also book appointments to see Council customer services officers there about their housing benefit or council tax queries. 

In addition, Cumbria Police have a presence in the building and hold Mobile Police Desk sessions there. Local charities, the Maryport Cultural Consortium and organisations like the Centre for Leadership Performance have also been holding events, meetings and workshops in this space.

Completion date

Autumn 2022
 

Public Loos and Public Realm

The project

Part of the Made in Maryport initiative, the public toilets on Irish Street, close to the harbourside, have been transformed thanks to local artist Alan Roper.

Why?

Shoppers, walkers, locals, tourists – these public toilets are open to all in one of the town’s busiest locations. This artwork draws attention to these vital public conveniences and brightens up a dreary concrete structure on Maryport’s attractive harbour.

Cost

£3,200

Funders

Historic England Heritage Action Zone

Background

The new Made In Maryport cultural consortium was flushed with success after this, the first in a series of art projects, brightened up one of the town’s most useful buildings. 

Artist Alan Roper created an eye-catching new artwork which is anything but bog standard. With a very colourful Roman theme, the mural on the harbour-side of the structure shows visitors exactly what’s inside – large lettering spells out the word ‘Latrine’ – alongside the image of a helmet-wearing soldier giving a nod to Maryport’s Roman past.

The two artworks were the first projects to be publicly unveiled under the Made in Maryport banner. It’s the brainchild of the Maryport Arts and Heritage Partnership – a group made up of Cumberland Council, Senhouse Roman Museum, Maryport Maritime Museum, The Settlement, the Cultura Trust which owns the Camp Farm Roman site, Yan Tan Tethera Creative company and The Maryporters community group.

Completion date

Summer 2022

The project

This initiative will focus on the signage and the streetscape throughout the town, with a particular focus on the ‘customer journey’ to and from the railway station. 

Why?

The aim is to make the town centre a more pleasant place for local people to shop and enjoy the hospitality businesses, and encourage visitors to use the long stay car parking and increase their time in the town.

Cost

£826,000

Funders

Future High Streets Fund

Background

There are many issues to solve to improve the town’s connectivity, making it a friendlier place for pedestrians to explore, and creating a better ‘liveable’ environment.

That includes tackling a lack of clear signage to car parks and local attractions, removing clutter caused by barriers and bollards, heavy parking on Senhouse Street, little quality green space and very few trees. 

Progress

The proposed improvements are likely to include improved street furniture, better lighting, wider pavements, new planting, pedestrian crossings and traffic calming measures. 

We are improving the link between the town, the harbourside and the promenade by creating a new Boardwalk across the beach known by many locals as la’al harbour. It will sit above the tideline and be crafted from highly weatherproof materials. 

We will also be tackling a lack of clear signage to car parks and local attractions and removing clutter caused by barriers and bollards, as well as easing heavy parking on Senhouse Street. There are also plans for a ‘pocket park’ on John Street and Crosby Street to give more quality green space and more trees.  

We want to make the walk from the train station to the harbourside and from the car parks to the main shopping areas a more pleasant experience. We also want to add other attractions like an e-bike hub and safe bike storage, as well as capitalising on the brilliant cycle routes that already exist on the West Cumbrian coast. 

Completion date

Summer 2024

Paint the Town and Shopfront Improvement Scheme

The project

Shopfronts across the town centre are being revamped and restored to make them more in keeping with Maryport’s historic architecture.

Why?

The aim is to make the town centre as attractive as possible, giving those who live and work here a beautiful place to be, and to make the visitor experience as pleasant as it can be, encouraging them to stay longer, and keep coming back.

Cost

£190,000

Funders

Historic England Heritage Action Zone

Background

Maryport’s high street has a great mix of independents and national names. They range from practical stores, like hardware shops, to galleries and gifts, plus services including hairdressers and professional services firms. Over time, some of the shop fronts have become tatty or unflattering to the business and the high street setting but this project aims to improve that. 
This project draws on Maryport’s Edwardian, Georgian and Victorian heritage to help keep the character of the historic buildings throughout the main shopping streets. 

Progress

From the big expanse of Heron Foods, one of the longest shopfronts on Senhouse Street, to smaller stores of all types, this is an initiative which is really brightening up the town centre. One of the new improved premises will become a banking hub, shared between a number of major banks, to ensure a vital service remains in the town.

A Shopfront Guide has been created to inspire business and building owners to restore their shopfronts in a way which is in keeping with the town’s varied architectural styles and benefit the designated conservation area for many more years to come.

Completion date

2023
 

The project

The Paint the Town project aims to brighten up the masonry and woodwork of scores of buildings, enhancing the full programme of regeneration work.

Why?

The aim is to brighten up the town centre, encourage property owners, particularly those with prominent or key corner properties in the high street, to improve their buildings, and to give them a cost-effective facelift.

Cost

£0

Funders

Paint donated by West Port Windows and Remmers

Background

Two thousand litres of free paint are on offer to transform Maryport’s businesses and residential properties. The Paint the Town initiative is a partnership between Maryport Business Group, local employer West Port Windows, and Cumberland Council.

West Port Windows has donated 1,000 litres of timber paint which can be mixed to any colour, either to match existing paintwork or refresh tired old windowframes and doors. In addition, Remmers, a German paint company which works with West Port, has donated 1,000 litres of masonry paint which can be used on rendered façades or stone window and door surrounds. A palette of colours has been chosen to complement Maryport’s historic architecture.

Progress

Owners of business and residential properties within most of the area already being improved by the Future High Streets Fund investment are eligible to apply. Maryport Business Group is taking orders and facilitating the delivery or collection of paint for property owners.

Completion

Open ended until the supplies of paint are used up.
 

Love Maryport Living and Cultural Consortium

The project

Empty upstairs properties are being converted or renovated to make more town centre living accommodation available.

Why?

The focus of Love Maryport Living is to kickstart the revitalisation of unoccupied spaces above shops encouraging more people to live, socialise and spend in the town.

Cost

£960,000

Funders

Future High Streets, Cumberland Council & private sector

Background

A host of empty properties are being brought back in to use thanks to the Love Maryport Living project. 

Research has shown that around 70% of upper floor properties in Maryport are not in residential use, either because they have been historically used as storage or office space for the businesses below, because shopkeepers no longer traditionally live on the premises, or because residential tenants have moved on and not been replaced. All of the properties that are part of the scheme are either empty residential units, with many not having been lived in for several years, or the vacant upper floors of shops that are being converted into flats.

Progress

A total of 16 new residential properties are being created under this phase of the scheme. They include the creation of apartments in the former bank with its distinctive domed roof at 68 Senhouse Street. Bringing landmark buildings like this back into full use is a great success of this scheme.

Eligible property owners have received funding of up to £60,000 per residential unit created but must pay at least 20% of the renovation costs themselves. The refurbished buildings can be used as residential properties or as holiday accommodation under the terms of the funding contracts.

Completion date

Autumn 2023
 

The project

Designed to celebrate the past, present, and future of the town, the ‘Made in Maryport’ Cultural Programme will engage local communities including children, young people and families. 

Why?

The initiative will create an annual series of events that will bring even more life and vitality to Maryport.

Cost

Up to £90,000

Funder

Historic England High Street Heritage Action Zone

Background

Five festivals, utilising existing key dates, will be held throughout the year to attract people to take part, visit and enjoy cultural venues and events, and bring Maryport’s distinctive heritage to life.
The Cultural Consortium will develop and deliver an extensive programme of activities through new and existing partnerships, increasing capacity, developing new working practices, and encouraging new audiences.

Local artists and professionals will be commissioned to produce creative outputs that tell the stories of the people and create new experiences and memories, helping to change the narrative of Maryport and improve perceptions of the high street as a more attractive, engaging, and vibrant place to be.

Progress The eye-catching new mural on the harbourside public toilets, the creation of a series of oral history films, a new piece of art on display in the Town Hall, and events ranging from comedy to music to poetry are some of the early Made in Maryport attractions.

Made in Maryport is the brainchild of the Maryport Arts and Heritage Partnership – a group made up of Cumberland Council, Senhouse Roman Museum, Maryport Maritime Museum, The Settlement, the Cultura Trust which owns the Camp Farm Roman site, Yan Tan Tethera Creative company and The Maryporters community group.
 

The boardwalk

Maryport’s new Boardwalk will link two key destinations in the town.

The new stretch of accessible pathway will join the town’s promenade and harbourside, crossing the sandy area known locally as La’al Harbour.

The Boardwalk is part of the transformation of Maryport’s public realm using money from the Government’s Future High Streets Fund.

There was a public vote to decide the colour of the Boardwalk – they chose a ‘sand’ colour for the decking which is made of a very strong glass reinforced plastic material with a honeycomb structure so water won't pool on it. This decking is already used around the world in environments where safety is a priority and very strong non-slip surfaces are required.

The structure will be built on driven concrete piles which have been designed to withstand potential high tides. A robust steel framework grid will be attached to these foundations, on to which the decking panels are securely fastened. The decking materials have been designed by structural engineers to be safe and accessible.


 

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